Conducting a qualitative evidence synthesis of trial-sibling studies to inform an intervention review: experiences and preliminary results from two Cochrane Reviews

Session: 

Oral session: Qualitative evidence synthesis methodology (2)

Date: 

Thursday 24 October 2019 - 11:00 to 12:30

Location: 

All authors in correct order:

Aldin A1, Chakraverty D2, Baumeister A3, Monsef I1, Noyes J4, Jakob T1, Seven ÜS2, Anapa G2, Woopen C3, Kalbe E5, Skoetz N6
1 University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Cologne, Department I of Internal Medicine, Center for Integrated Oncology Aachen Bonn Cologne Duesseldorf, Cochrane Haematological Malignancies, Cologne, Germany
2 Medical Psychology, Neuropsychology and Gender Studies and Center for Neuropsychological Diagnostics and Intervention (CeNDI), University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
3 Research Unit Ethics, Institute for the History of Medicine and Medical Ethics, University Hospital of Cologne and Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (CERES), University of Cologne, Germany
4 Centre for Health-Related Research, Fron Heulog, Bangor University, Bangor, UK
5 Medical Psychology, Neuropsychology and Gender Studies and Center for Neuropsychological Diagnostics and Intervention (CeNDI), University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Cologne, Germany
6 University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Cologne, Department I of Internal Medicine, Center for Integrated Oncology Aachen Bonn Cologne Duesseldorf, Cochrane Cancer, Germany
Presenting author and contact person

Presenting author:

Angela Aldin

Contact person:

Abstract text
Background: qualitative research aims to explore peoples’ opinions, experiences and their perception of the world and their surroundings. It explores behaviour and phenomena that may be difficult to quantify and explain by numbers. A qualitative evidence synthesis (QES) summarizes the evidence from primary qualitative studies. A QES can inform an intervention review by synthesising evidence on the pathways through which complex interventions work, thereby considering consumers’ experiences regarding these interventions. Furthermore, a QES can address questions on aspects other than effectiveness, such as health equity. Combining qualitative and quantitative evidence can ensure that systematic reviews provide maximum value to health policy and decision making.

Objectives: to combine qualitative and quantitative evidence on interventions for improving health literacy in migrants, and address aspects of equity relating to gender and migration.

Methods: the intervention review assesses interventions for improving health literacy in migrants, and whether female and male migrants may respond differently to these. The linked QES will inform the intervention review by synthesizing evidence from qualitative trial-sibling studies, which are conducted alongside interventions to consider consumers’ experiences in the evaluation of the intervention. Thereby, the QES attempts to identify factors associated with gender and migration that may play a role in the design, delivery, and effectiveness of health literacy interventions for female and male migrants. The same team of authors conducts both reviews in parallel, and continuously exchanges intelligence on methodological and content-related issues. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (01GL1723).

Results: we screened the search results (2732) of the intervention review to identify health literacy interventions for migrants. So far we have included 36 relevant references on interventions for improving health literacy in migrants. We have also identified 13 trial-sibling studies of these interventions so far. We will conduct a citation pearl search, hand search the references of the included intervention studies and contact principal investigators of the interventions to locate more trial-sibling studies. Further results will be presented at the Colloquium.

Conclusions: the QES will provide a broader, in-depth explanation of how and why interventions for improving health literacy in migrants have their effects. It will help to identify and explain which factors should be taken into account in the design and delivery of equitable health literacy interventions.

Patient or healthcare consumer involvement: the (combined) findings of the qualitative and the intervention review will be shared and discussed with patients and consumers as peer-reviewers.