Cochrane First Aid: a global platform for guideline developers, trainers and laypeople

Session: 

Oral session: Knowledge translation and communicating evidence (5)

Date: 

Wednesday 23 October 2019 - 16:00 to 17:30

Location: 

All authors in correct order:

De Buck E1, Avau B2, Vanhove A2, Borra V3, Cassan P4, Vandekerckhove P5
1 Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Belgian Red Cross, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, KU Leuven, Cochrane First Aid, Belgium
2 Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Belgian Red Cross, Cochrane Belgium, Cochrane First Aid, Belgium
3 Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Belgian Red Cross, Cochrane First Aid, Belgium
4 Global First Aid Reference Centre, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, France
5 Belgian Red Cross, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, KU Leuven, Belgium
Presenting author and contact person

Presenting author:

Emmy De Buck

Contact person:

Abstract text
Background: each day, people across the world face injuries and acute illnesses, for which laypeople often provide assistance, which is called 'first aid'. First aid education is a very cost-effective way to improve public health and therefore effective first aid interventions should be promoted.

Objectives: with the Cochrane First Aid Field (CFA), launched in 2019, we wanted to develop a global platform to advocate the development, dissemination and uptake of high-quality evidence on first aid interventions.

Methods: in the CFA strategic plan, several initiatives are included to involve our target audience of guideline developers, first aid curriculum developers, first aid trainers, and laypeople performing and receiving first aid:
1) we included a consumer representative as a member of the field’s Advisory Group;
2) field priorities were listed following consultation with different stakeholders;
3) we collaborate closely with the Centre for Evidence-Based Practice (CEBaP) of the Belgian Red Cross and the Global First Aid Reference Centre (GFARC) of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), which provide a global link to our target audience;
4) relevant Cochrane Systematic Reviews are presented as blogshots, but are also translated into first aid guidelines in plain language;
5) information is disseminated through social media to reach a broad public.

Results: one of the initiatives we will present in greater detail at this Colloquium is the development of Cochrane evidence into first aid guidelines. A first scan of Cochrane Systematic Reviews resulted in 60 relevant reviews. Via CEBaP and GFARC these reviews were included in evidence-based first aid guidelines, including the IFRC international first aid guidelines, and more contextualized guidelines for, for example, Sub-Saharan Africa (CEBaP). To translate the systematic review evidence into recommendations, we organized expert panel meetings with content experts and consumers (e.g. first aid instructors). The guidelines are used to train 15 million laypeople per year globally, and therefore have a great reach. We will present other results on how we involved laypeople in CFA’s work at the Colloquium.

Conclusions: Cochrane First Aid serves as a liaison between science and practice, and undertakes several efforts to involve and reach laypeople.

Patient or healthcare consumer involvement: we involve consumers at different levels of CFA’s work: through the Advisory Board, in priority setting, in guideline development and training, and via direct communication through different platforms.